Speaking For Kids

Listening When Students Speak

My grandfather has always told me, pick something you love and do it well. A wise adage that seems easy to follow but can always take a little twist or turn in life.

For example, what if you don’t have a role model or figure to give you such sage advice? What if you aren’t able to use your talents or don’t know how to identify them to help those around you? What if your skills need a refreshing or there is a cultural or language barrier that precludes you from doing that work well?

This adage came to mind along with these questions most recently at our joint Students Speak events with MACAE (the Michigan Association of Community and Adult Education). These opportunities have been so critical in helping policymakers to understand the importance of adult education, but also to hear directly from participants- their success and their struggles. Here are some highlights from me:

Dreams and aspirations can translate into real success. These dreams could be to increase their employment status or make large investments in the local community such as a home.

Highly-skilled ESL immigrants face challenges with credentialing. One of the challenges that was raised was the transference of degreed and credentials of highly skilled immigrants coming to the United States. This lack of transference can directly impact the upward mobility of students and families simply because one’s English proficiency is not on part with their highly skilled training.

Adult Education supports generational education. This direct generational education impact supports local school districts and strengthens families. In addition, it instills in future generations the importance of lifelong learning.

Adult Education offers alternative pathways to success. Adult education offers courses designed with the students in mind that help increase their academic proficiency while also giving them the direct hands-on vocabulary and context to be successful in the workplace.

Over the next few months we will continue to connect with policymakers about these issues and the importance of adult education. I firmly believe that an investment in these learners Is a return on investment that continues to strengthen families and to build resilient communities.

As neighbors, fellow citizens, workers and constituents, we have a responsibly to help others “pick something they love and to do it well”.

My grandfather would love that.

Patrick Brown is an Outreach Associate for Michigan’s Children, in partnership with the Michigan Association of Community and Adult Education

Perseverance and Partnerships

So much attention has been paid in this lame duck session, and rightly so, to efforts of the legislature as they make adjustments to either ballot proposals or the legislation passed to thwart those proposals from getting on the ballot, and to try to restrict incoming administrative leadership in the Governor’s office, state departments and the secretary of state’s office. There has been attention to last ditch efforts to pass legislation related to how schools will be held accountable for student success, the environment and even how pet stores are operating. Attention to the effort to Raise the Age, that Michigan’s Children and many others have been involved with for several legislative sessions, did not result in success these last few days of the session, and like many other debates will begin again in January.

One success in this crazy lame duck session that deserves much more attention than it has received, since it has the potential to really improve the lives of the most vulnerable children, youth and families in Michigan, is the Senate passage last night of the Children’s Assurance of Quality Foster Care Act.

Over the last three legislative sessions, going on six years now, there has been a package of bills introduced that acknowledge in state law that kids and caregivers in the foster care system need some protections—about what is provided to them, about what they can expect from the system, and about what they can do if those things aren’t taking place. Almost six years ago, after a process that included feedback from young people involved in the foster care system, a group of three legislators in the House introduced what at the time was considered the Foster Child Bill of Rights. That session, they didn’t even get a hearing in a legislative committee. But those legislators, those young people and allies like Michigan’s Children didn’t give up and the bills were introduced the next legislative session. This time, they had bi-partisan support in the House and powerful co-sponsors who chaired critical committees. They passed through the House with ease, nearly unanimously. But, the Senate didn’t take them up – not even a committee hearing, and again they failed to make it through. But those legislators, those young people, and allies like Michigan’s Children didn’t give up. The bills were introduced again this legislative session, and called the Children’s Assurance of Quality Foster Care Act. Other powerful allies like the Jr. Leagues of Michigan were added to the mix, and those bills again passed nearly unanimously through the House.

The Senate was still not moving on the bills, but this time, we garnered even more powerful allies. Oakland University and The New Foster Care started putting pressure on their friends, including the Lt. Governor, Brian Calley, who then put pressure on his friends in the Senate to move the bills through. This happened just this week, with only a couple of days left in the legislative session. Unfortunately, this also required an amendment that we didn’t agree with to facilitate passage. While small, it was an unnecessary change that was a little hard to stomach, but we all did to make sure that it could still move forward. It is important to acknowledge the Lt. Governor for his actions to push things to the finish line, as well as the legislative co-sponsors in the House: Jim Runestad, who is coming back next year as a state Senator; Terry Sabo, who took up the torch from his predecessor to sponsor these bills; and Pamela Hornberger, who put her 1st term efforts behind the package. Each of the bills had multiple legislative co-sponsors as well.

The advocacy lessons: perseverance and partnerships. Most good pieces of legislation take more than one try to make it through. There are about 2,500 pieces of legislation that get introduced in any given legislative session in Michigan, and Legislators have to decide what takes priority. It is much easier for things NOT to go through than for them to pass. Keeping at it when something is important is key. As in many areas, this package of bills is a beginning, not an end to this conversation about ensuring quality in our foster care system, so we will continue next session to move forward from this foundation.

And as good and strong as your voice is, it never hurts to have friends involved. You never know where you might be able to connect with friends in high places, so keep bringing all sorts of partners along with you. We first met now Senator-elect Runestad when we partnered with him as a County Commissioner for our KidSpeaks in Oakland County, before he was even in the legislature. We’ve worked with leadership at The New Foster Care for years, but were glad to strengthen our relationship with Oakland University through their partnership with one of our youth-led candidate forums this fall. You never know where your relationships might take you.

As we move into 2019, with a new Governor and a new legislative session, we will again take up the mantle for some things have been left undone, work to maintain progress that has been made, and look to new opportunities to best support children, youth and families. For that work to succeed, we continue to enjoy our work with great advocacy, service and research partners and redouble efforts to build new ones. If you haven’t yet taken our pledge to make kids and families a priority in 2019, please do. We look forward to working with you!

Michele Corey is Michigan’s Children’s Vice President for Programs

Meet Lauren, Our Newest Intern

November 16, 2018 – Hello!! I am beyond excited to be spending my final year of Graduate School at Michigan’s Children. Come May 2019, I will be receiving my Masters in Social Work with a concentration in Organizational and Community Leadership from Michigan State University, GO GREEN!

I started my journey at Michigan State in 2012 and have been here way too long (with a few degree changes) but, I have gained an incredible amount of knowledge and skills. In December, 2016 I completed my Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Sciences undergraduate degree which guided me to pursue an MSW degree.

When I was a little kid, I always wanted to be like my grandparents and my mom… a teacher. But, as time went on and I witnessed the difficulties my mom had in the public school system and I knew that teaching wasn’t the best route for me to take. I tried many different directions but ultimately end up with the same passion – to serve the children of our world. Because I have never pursued a teacher career path, I have instead interned at an after-school program, assistant taught summer school, and did community service coordination for high school students. Through all of these experiences, I have loved working with students.

So why am I working in public policy, and am I liking it? First, I am loving it! Second, you can advocate for the best interest in children by working directly with them, and we need to improve the systems that serve them through policy advocacy and change. It is critical to understand and relate to the populations you are advocating for. At Michigan’s Children – we are working to change the odds for children. In the future, I hope to take my experience in direct care and in advocacy to continue to better the lives of children and families.

This year at Michigan’s Children I have the great opportunity to learn about election advocacy and legislative advocacy. So far this year, much of our energy has been focused election advocacy and hosting NINE amazing candidate forums around the state. These forums bring students, young adults, community members, and adults out to ask their candidates for legislative office questions about issues that they care about most. At these forums, I found myself awestruck. The personal stories, questions, and answers all drive me to continue to do this work and it is truly amazing what you can learn once you open the floor to others and listen intently. It was truly empowering to watch citizen involvement in the political process and if those who asked the impressive questions are our future leaders, I am ecstatic and ready!

A couple others things I have focused on include the Raise The Age campaign, foster care research, early childhood advocacy, third grade reading research, and our social media networks (T: @MichChildren F: Michigan’s Children).

With the elections changing our state legislature and Governor, things are changing in our office. With these changes, Michigan’s Children will focus on educating policymakers on issues that matter most and continually encouraging others to get involved in the political process. This next phase will be incredible and I can’t wait to see what I can learn!

Lauren Starke is an intern at Michigan’s Children in her final year of graduate school at Michigan State University where she is pursuing her master’s degree in social work.

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