Budget Basics

June 2016
The Fiscal Year 2017 Budget (6/30/16)

The final budget for fiscal year (FY) 2017 has been approved and signed by Governor Snyder. Now is a great time to talk to your elected officials, including candidates vying to represent you in the State House, about the spending decisions they made for FY2017 and what they might do differently to better support children, youth and families.

May 2016
What’s Still At Play in the Fiscal Year 2016-17 Budget (5/10/2016)

After reviewing the Governor’s budget recommendations for fiscal year 2017 (FY2017), the House and Senate have approved their budget recommendations. Now the Legislature focuses on points of difference to be decided in Conference Committees. Read more about a few critical items at play in the FY2017 budget that will impact children, youth and families in Michigan.

A Precarious Imbalance: Federal Budget Proposals Leave Michigan Families Particularly Vulnerable (5/2/2016)

In the past month, three Congressional panels have begun dismantling safety net supports for low‐income working families with children, highlighting Michigan’s precarious reliance on federal funds for programs aimed at struggling children and families.

Three times in March, committees in the U.S. House of Representatives voted in favor of bills that would be harmful to children, specifically those abused and neglected, and from low-income families.

March 2016
Michigan’s Children Advocates Priorities in the Budget Process to Support Third Grade Reading (3/8/2016)

The FY2017 budget process is underway, and Michigan’s Children has been meeting with Legislators and other advocates around some of our key priority areas that help to support efforts to improve early reading proficiency.

Improving Third Grade Reading in Michigan: Needed Investments in the FY2017 State Budget (3/8/16)
The Right Expanded Learning Opportunities Improve 3rd Grade Reading (3/8/1016)
Supporting Family Literacy: Equipping Parents and Children with Literacy Skills for Lifelong Success (3/8/2016)

The Governor’s FY2016 Budget Proposal: What it Means for Children, Youth and Families in Michigan

On February 10, 2016, Governor Snyder presented his budget recommendations for fiscal year 2017 (FY2017), which begins on October 1, 2016 and ends September 30, 2017. As anticipated, Governor Snyder focused his budget recommendations on the needs of the City of Flint in response to the water crisis in addition to proposing a fiscal solution to address the Detroit Public Schools’ pending budget shortfall. The annual budget is the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities. It is during the budget process that decisions are made about the expenditure of state revenues for public programs and services.

The Governor’s Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Recommendations: Investments in Young Children and Families (3/8/16)
The Governor’s Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Recommendations: What It Means for Youth in Michigan (3/4/16)

January 2016
Better Financing Early On® Michigan Early Intervention – January 2016 Update(1/2016)

Early On, Michigan’s program for the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act – Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities Program (IDEA Part C), provides early intervention services to families with infants and toddlers birth to age three who have a developmental delay or disability. Michigan receives $11.8 million in federal IDEA Part C funding to serve approximately 18,000 children. Of those children, about 40% are also eligible for Michigan mandatory special education (MMSE) due to the level of their developmental delays while the majority of Early On children are only eligible for Early On services and not more intensive special education services. However, the children who are “Early On only” are the children who, with adequate intervention, can developmentally “catch-up” and not need special education services later on.

October 2015
Better Financing Early On Michigan Early intervention (October 2015)

Early On, Michigan’s program for the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act – Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities Program (IDEA Part C), provides early intervention services to families with infants and toddlers birth to age three who have a developmental delay or disability. National estimates indicate that of all young children who receive appropriate early intervention services, 37% of those children will not need special education services when they enter preschool and 42% will not need special education services by the time they reach kindergarten.  However, Early On in Michigan continues to be sorely underfunded.  Learn more about financing options for Early On in this one-page overview.

The Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Process in Michigan: Opportunities to Advocate for Children and Families (10/2015)

The annual budget is the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities.  It is during the budget process that decisions are made about the expenditure of state revenues.  Unfortunately, it has been difficult for many individuals to become involved in the public policy and budget process, particularly for those most likely to be impacted by decisions that may affect inequities.  A major barrier is that the budget process is too unfamiliar to many, and budget bills often move quickly through legislative committees.  Here is an overview of what you need to know about the state budget process to get involved to ensure that your priorities are part of budget conversations.

June 2015
Fiscal Year 2016 Budget: What It Means for Youth in Michigan (6/26/15)

The final budget for fiscal year (FY) 2016 has been approved and signed by Governor Snyder. Now is a great time to talk to your elected officials about the spending decisions they made for FY2016 – about the good funding decisions that will benefit your communities and families, and the funding challenges you continue to face that you hope will be addressed in future budgets.

The Fiscal Year 2016 Budget and How It Impacts Educational Equity (6/26/15)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce. Gaps in opportunity caused by Michigan’s extreme economic hardships and exacerbated by structural barriers due to race or ethnicity, contribute to unacceptable disparities in outcomes. Inequities in birth outcomes and literacy development result in differences in socio-emotional development, intellectual functioning, and health that are evident as early as 9 months of age. These gaps then contribute to differences in educational success, high school graduation and college enrollment, leading to clear disparities in earnings and other outcomes over a lifetime.

Federal Budget Must Prioritize Michigan Children (6/22/15)

The federal budget is the single most powerful expression of the federal government’s priorities. It is during the budget process that decisions are made about the expenditure of federal revenues, and there are many competing interests that the President and Congress must consider when dividing up tax dollars. With finite resources, changes in tax policies and the appropriation of revenues can benefit groups of U.S. and Michigan residents, while leaving others behind. Of particular concern is the potential impact on the children and families that outcome data show are already facing challenges and being left behind – children of color, children from low-income families, and children shouldering significant challenges.

Fiscal Year 2016 Investments in Young Children and Their Families (6/18/15)

The final budget for fiscal year (FY) 2016 has been approved and signed by Governor Snyder. Now is a great time to talk to your elected officials about the spending decisions they made for FY2016 – about the good funding decisions that will benefit your communities and families, and the funding challenges you continue to face that you hope will be addressed in future budgets.

Fiscal Year 2016 Investments in Young Children and Their Families (6/10/2015)

The Legislature has approved the budget bills for fiscal year 2016, and they now await the Governor’s approval.  The budget include some wins for young children including a significant focus on improving third grade literacy that supports an array of programming including evidence-based home visiting and high quality child care.  This Budget Basics report provides an overview on key spending provisions in the FY2016 budget that will impact families with young children.

May 2015
What’s Still at Play in the Fiscal Year 2016 Budget and How It Impacts Equity (5/12/15)

After reviewing the Governor’s budget recommendations for fiscal year 2016 (FY2016), the House and Senate have approved their budget recommendations. Now the Legislature focuses on points of difference to be decided in Conference Committees; and once the Legislature approves a FY2016 budget, the Governor has the power to veto any spending line item. Engagement with your elected officials is still critically important – particularly on equity-promoting strategies that still need to be negotiated. Here are a few key items still at play in the FY2016 budget and how the options being discussed would impact equitable outcomes for children, youth and families.

April 2015
Better Financing Early On® Michigan Early Intervention (4/20/15)

Early On, Michigan’s program for the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act – Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities Program (IDEA Part C), provides early intervention services to families with infants and toddlers birth to age three who have a developmental delay or disability. National estimates indicate that of all young children who receive appropriate early intervention services, 37% of those children will not need special education services when they enter preschool and 42% will not need special education services by the time they reach kindergarten.  However, Early On in Michigan continues to be sorely underfunded.  Learn more about financing options for Early On in this one-page overview.

FY2016 Budget Recommendations: What They Mean for Youth in Michigan (4/9/15)

The annual budget is the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities. It is during the budget process that decisions are made about the expenditure of state revenues for public programs and services, which will impact youth and families that outcome data show are already facing significant challenges. With finite resources and competing interests, decision-makers must prioritize budget investments that ensure all young people have opportunities for education success and pathways to college and/or a career.  Learn more about the recommendations that will impact youth in Michigan.

The FY2016 Budget Proposals: What They Mean for Young Children and Their Families (4/9/15)

In March, the House and Senate put forward their budget recommendations for fiscal year 2016 (FY2016) through the Appropriations Subcommittee process.  There are significant differences between the Governor’s, the House Subcommittees’, and the Senate Subcommittees’ budget recommendations in key areas impacting young children and their families who face the most challenges. Learn the details of these recommendations, which will be further discussed by each chamber’s full appropriations committees and by all members of the House and Senate before differences are ironed out in conference committee.

March 2015
A Quick Glance at the FY2016 Budget Recommendations (3/30/15)

The last full week of March, the House and Senate appropriations subcommittees released their budget bills for Fiscal Year 2016, which begins on October 1, 2015 and ends September 30, 2016. As anticipated, the Senate K-12 Education Subcommittee included a significant focus on third grade reading and adult education while the House School Aid Subcommittee eliminated several categorical programs to provide a more significant increase to the foundation allowance. Here is a quick overview on the key budget items that Michigan’s Children is focusing on that will impact education outcomes in Michigan.

The Governor’s FY2016 Budget Proposal: What it Means for Young Children and Their Families (3/24/15)

On February 11, 2015, Governor Snyder released his budget recommendations for Fiscal Year 2016, which begins October 1, 2015 and ends September 30, 2016.  The Governor included a significant focus on improving third grade reading, which provides a unique opportunity to ensure that young children can access opportunities they need to begin kindergarten ready to succeed with the skills to become proficient readers.  Read our overview on the key early childhood provisions in the Governor’s budget.

A Comprehensive Approach to Improve 3rd Grade Literacy

The Governor’s focus on improving third grade reading proficiency was supported by a $25 million recommendation in his fiscal year 2016 budget.  While his investments support an array of programs and services to improve literacy, his recommendations don’t go far enough to ensure that all young readers – particularly readers of color and from low-income families – are proficient by third grade.  Michigan’s Children pulled together several recommendations on key programs that will move the dime on this important benchmark.

February 2015

Governor Snyder’s FY2016 Education & School Aid Budget Recommendations

The annual budget is the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities. It is during the budget process that decisions are made about the expenditure of state revenues for public programs and services, which will impact students that outcome data show are already struggling to achieve in school.  As anticipated, Governor Snyder focused his education efforts on improving third grade reading, supporting at-risk students, and expanding career and tech education — all opportunities that will help reduce the achievement gap.

A Quick Glance of Governor Snyder’s FY2016 Budget Recommendations

On February 11, 2015, Governor Rick Snyder released his budget recommendations for Fiscal Year 2016, which begins on October 1, 2015 and ends September 30, 2016. At the same time, he also issued Executive Order 2015-5 to address the revenue shortfall that Michigan is facing in the current state budget.  See our quick glance outlining the Governor’s budget recommendations that will impact Michigan children, youth and families.

January 2015

Federal Budget Must Prioritize Michigan Children (1/2015)

Federal funds support 42 percent of Michigan’s total fiscal year 2015 state budget, but support significantly higher percentages of department budgets that serve children, youth and families.  With federal programming designed to increase opportunities for the most challenged children, youth and families; it is crucial for the federal budget to prioritize funding to support these programs which has been vastly insufficient and on the decline in recent years.  This overview shows the reliance of federal funds in the Michigan Department of Community Health, Department of Education, and Department of Human Services.

September 2014

The Budget Process in Michigan: Opportunities to Advocate for Children & Families (9/2014)

The annual budget is the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities.  Michigan’s decision-makers need to prioritize budget investments that improve outcomes for all children by closing the equity gaps that begin early and accumulate over a lifetime.  Unfortunately, it has been difficult for many parents, teachers, community leaders and child advocates to become involved in the budget making process, particularly for those most likely to be impacted by decisions that may affect inequities. A major barrier is that the budget process is too unfamiliar to many, and budget bills often move quickly through legislative committees.  This overview tells you what you need to know about the state budget process for fiscal year 2016 so that you can get involved in budget advocacy.

July 2014

Fiscal Year 2015 Budgets Approved by Legislature and Governor

The final budget bills for fiscal year (FY) 2015 have been approved and signed into law by Governor Snyder, with no vetoes on any issues pertaining to children, youth and families.  At this point, elected officials are on break and focusing on elections in August and November.  Campaign events provide a great avenue to talk with the candidates about the state budget and how you expect them to prioritize issues affecting children and families in budget discussions if elected or re-elected into office.  Use our Budget Basics publications to understand what the final FY2015 budget means for young children; older youth; and addressing inequities in child and family outcomes by race, income, and other challenges.

June 2014

Fiscal Year 2015 Investments in Early Childhood (6/13/2014)

The Legislature has approved its budget bills for fiscal year 2015, and they now head to Governor Snyder for his approval.  As anticipated, another $65 million increase to the Great Start Readiness Program is included in the state budget to make Michigan a “no-wait state” for preschool.  Learn more about the early childhood provisions in the FY2015 budget in our latest Budget Basics publication.

May 2014

UPDATE: The Fiscal Year 2015 Budget Proposals and How They Impact Equity (5/12/2014)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce. Gaps in opportunity caused by Michigan’s extreme economic hardships and exacerbated by structural barriers due to race or ethnicity, contribute to unacceptable disparities in outcomes.  Disparities in child outcomes can be mitigated with targeted, strategic, and equitable public policy and budget decision-making that focus on eliminating barriers to opportunity.  Our latest Budget Basics publication looks at the FY2015 budget proposals by the Governor, the House, and the Senate and analyzes how their funding decisions will impact equitable outcomes for Michigan children.

The Fiscal Year 2015 Budget: Points of Differences to Be Negotiated (5/12/2014)

The House and Senate have approved all of their budget bills for fiscal year (FY) 2015.  As anticipated, the House rolled up all of its budget bills into two omnibus bills – one for Education (HB 5314) including School Aid, Community Colleges, and Higher Education; and the department budgets into another omnibus budget bill (HB 5313).  The Senate kept each budget bill separate.  At this point in the budget process, the Legislature focuses on points of difference to be decided in Conference Committees; and in the end, the Governor has the power to veto any spending line item, so engagement with your elected officials is still critically important.

April 2014

The Fiscal Year 2015 Budget Proposals and How They Impact Equity (4/24/2014)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce. Gaps in opportunity caused by Michigan’s extreme economic hardships and exacerbated by structural barriers due to race or ethnicity, contribute to unacceptable disparities in outcomes.  Disparities in child outcomes can be mitigated with targeted, strategic, and equitable public policy and budget decision-making that focus on eliminating barriers to opportunity.  Our latest Budget Basics publication looks at the FY2015 budget proposals by the Governor, the House Appropriations Committee, and the Senate Appropriations Committee and analyzes how their funding decisions will impact equitable outcomes for Michigan children.

March 2014

The Governor’s Fiscal Year 2015 Budget: Is It Promoting Equity to Ensure All Children Are Ready to Learn & Lead? (3/3/2014)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce. As Michigan becomes more diverse, funding decisions that do not explicitly address underlying inequities in resource and opportunity will lead to longer-term fiscal hardships for all Michigan residents. Gaps in opportunity caused by Michigan’s profound economic hardships, coupled with structural barriers by race or ethnicity, contribute to gaps in achievement throughout a student’s educational career.  Our latest Budget Basics looks at various provisions of the Governor’s fiscal year 2015 budget proposal and analyzes how each one will impact disparities in child outcomes — whether they will help reduce inequities, increase inequities, or have mixed results.

February 2014

Fiscal Year 2015 Budget: What the Governor is Proposing for Youth in Michigan (2/24/2014)

On Wednesday, February 5, 2014, Governor Snyder released his proposed state budget for fiscal year 2015.  The Governor’s budget includes some funding increases that would support youth in Michigan.  Highlights include $2 million to crate a year-round schools pilot; shifts to the way At-Risk funding would be allocated and the way that students would be deemed eligible for that funding, including prioritizing improvements in 3rd grade reading and college and career readiness and tying future funding to improvements in those two specific areas; and $1.8 million to reward districts who facilitate student participation in dual-enrollment options where students can take college courses while in high school.

Fiscal Year 2015 Budget: What the Governor is Proposing for Early Childhood in Michigan (2/18/2014)

On Wednesday, February 5, 2014, Governor Snyder released his proposed state budget for fiscal year 2015.  The Governor’s budget includes some funding increases that would support young children in Michigan.  Highlights include another $65 million increase for the Great Start Readiness Program to make Michigan a “no wait state” for preschool.  The Governor also proposes increasing support for the Child Development and Care program — the state’s child care subsidy system — to increase the maximum number of reimbursable child care hours from 80 to 90 hours in a two-week period, as well as to implement a tiered reimbursement system based on child care providers’ Great Start to Quality rating.  The Governor also proposes to expand home visiting services to rural communities in Northern Michigan and the Upper Peninsula.

October 2013
Federal Deficit Reduction Efforts Must Prioritize Michigan Children (10/2013)

The federal budget is the single most powerful expression of the federal government’s priorities. It is during the budget process that decisions are made about the expenditure of federal revenues, and there are many competing interests that the President and Congress must consider when dividing up tax dollars. With finite resources, changes in tax policies and in the appropriation of revenues can benefit groups of U.S. and Michigan residents, while leaving others behind. Of particular concern is the potential impact on the children and families that outcome data show are already facing challenges, including a lack of access to education and care in early childhood, health care throughout their lives, and opportunities for education and career success.

July 2013

The Budget Process in Michigan: Opportunities to Advocate for Children & Families (7/2013)

The annual budget is the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities.  Michigan’s decision-makers need to prioritize budget investments that improve outcomes for all children by closing the equity gaps that begin early and accumulate over a lifetime.  Unfortunately, it has been difficult for many parents, teachers, community leaders and child advocates to become involved in the budget making process, particularly for those most likely to be impacted by decisions that may affect inequities. A major barrier is that the budget process is too unfamiliar to many, and budget bills often move quickly through legislative committees.  This overview tells you what you need to know about the state budget process so that you can get involved in budget advocacy.  Though the ink has barely dried on the fiscal year 2014 budget bill, now is the time to begin preparing for the fiscal year 2015 budget.

June 2013

UPDATE: Medicaid Expansion in Michigan: Quick Facts on What It Means for Children, Youth and Families (06/18/2013)

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder made a huge step in a healthier direction for the state when he proposed to expand Medicaid access to Michigan residents by taking advantage of the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Though this expansion specifically covers adults in Michigan, it has significant implications for children and families in Michigan and the well-being of Michigan’s lowest-income families.  Learn more about Medicaid expansion, how it will help children and families, and what the current status is on Medicaid expansion proposals in the Legislature in our Budget Basics fact sheet.

The Fiscal Year 2014 Budget: Is It Promoting Equity to Ensure All Children Are Ready to Learn and Lead? (06/18/2013)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce. As Michigan becomes more diverse, funding decisions that do not explicitly address underlying inequities in resource and opportunity will lead to longer-term fiscal hardships for all Michigan residents. Gaps in opportunity caused by Michigan’s profound economic hardships, coupled with structural barriers by race or ethnicity, contribute to gaps in achievement throughout a student’s educational career. These long-term disparities in educational and life success have had profound and unacceptable economic, social and fiscal consequences for Michigan.  This Budget Basics document analyzes the fiscal year 2014 budget and how it will impact equitable outcomes for Michigan children.

Governor Signs Fiscal Year 2014 Budgets Into Law

On June 13, 2013, Governor Snyder signed the budget bills for fiscal year (FY) 2014 into law.  FY2014 begins October 1, 2013 and ends September 30, 2014.  As anticipated, the final budgets were in the form of two omnibus bills – one for Education (PA 62) including School Aid, Community Colleges, and Higher Education; and another (PA 63) for all of the department budgets.  The Governor did not veto any items in the Education budget bill but did veto several items in the Department budget bill that he deemed were unenforceable.  Of the vetoes, two specifically will impact young people including one that appropriated $340,000 for a precollege engingeering program that was scheduled to end in FY2013, and $750,000 for college scholarships for youth transitioning out of foster care.  The Governor stated that he would support the latter if it did not violate federal law.

The Fiscal Year 2014 State Budget:
What It Means for Young Children in Michigan
What It Means for Youth in Michigan

May 2013

Fiscal Year 2014 Budget: What It Means for Youth in Michigan (5/29/2013)

On May 28th, the Conference Committees approved all of their budget bills for FY2014.  Significant changes affecting youth include the Conference Committee’s increase in the per pupil foundation allowance for schools through a combination of increasing the basic and minimum foundation allowance as well as including an equity payment.  The Conference Committee also included the Governor’s recommendation for student-centric learning, Mental Health Innovations, and the Michigan Model for School Health.  The Committee also kept all three juvenile justice facilities open and included $1 million to support home- and community-based juvenile justice services.  The House has approved both omnibus budget bills (school bus and big bus) and the Senate has approved the school bus.  Once the Senate approves the big bus, the Governor will then approve or veto the budget bills, which opens up the possibility of line-item vetoes.

Fiscal Year 2014 Budget: What It Means for Young Children in Michigan (5/29/2013)

On May 28th, the Conference Committees approved all of their budget bills for FY2014.  Significant changes affecting young children include the Conference Committee’s inclusion of the Governor’s recommendation to expand the Great Start Readiness Preschool Program by $65 million and to include an increase in the slot amount to $3,625 per slot.  This expansion will allow an additional 16,000 half-day preschool slots for Michigan four-year-olds.  The Conference Committee also included $2 million to support the state’s Infant Mortality Reduction Plan though significantly reduced the pregnancy prevention line item in the Health and Wellness Initiative.  The House has approved both omnibus budget bills (school bus and big bus) and the Senate has approved the school bus.  Once the Senate approves the big bus, the Governor will then approve or veto the budget bills, which opens up the possibility of line-item vetoes.

UPDATE: Medicaid Expansion in Michigan: Quick Facts on What It Means for Children, Youth and Families (05/21/2013)

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder made a huge step in a healthier direction for the state when he proposed to expand Medicaid access to Michigan residents by taking advantage of the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Though this expansion specifically covers adults in Michigan, it has significant implications for children and families in Michigan and the well-being of Michigan’s lowest-income families.  Learn more about Medicaid expansion, how it will help children and families, and what the current proposal being debated is in our latest Budget Basics fact sheet.

FY2014 Investments in Early Childhood in Michigan: Points of Difference to be Negotiated in Conference Committee (5/17/2013)

The House and Senate have approved all of their budget bills for fiscal year 2014.  As anticipated, the House rolled up all of its budget bills into two omnibus bills – one for Education (HB 4228) and one for the department budgets (HB 4328).  The Senate kept each budget bill separately.  The House and Senate both included several amendments pertaining to young children coming out of subcommittees, so the final House and Senate approved budget bills are highlighted in this publication including differences that will be negotiated in conference committees like support for the Great Start Readiness Program, infant mortality, and lead abatement.

FY2014 Investments in Youth in Michigan: Points of Difference to be Negotiated in Conference Committee (5/17/2013)

The House and Senate have approved all of their budget bills for fiscal year 2014.  As anticipated, the House rolled up all of its budget bills into two omnibus bills – one for Education (HB 4228) and one for the department budgets (HB 4328).  The Senate kept each budget bill separately.  The House and Senate both included several amendments pertaining to youth coming out of subcommittees, so the final House and Senate approved budget bills are highlighted in this publication including differences that will be negotiated in conference committees like support for online learning, mental health supports for youth, and school-community partnerships.

The Fiscal Year 2014 Budget: How the Different Proposals Impact Equity to Ensure All Children Are Ready to Learn & Lead (Update: 5/17/2013)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce.  As Michigan becomes more diverse, funding decisions that do not explicitly address underlying inequities in resource and opportunity will lead to longer-term fiscal hardships for all Michigan residents.  The Governor, House, and Senate have proposed some differences in their budgets for fiscal year 2014 that will have varying impacts on reducing disparities in child and family outcomes.  This publication provides Michigan’s Children’s analysis of how their differing proposals will impact equity.

April 2013

House & Senate Appropriations Subcommittees Pass Fiscal Year 2014 Budgets: What It Means for Youth in Michigan (4/16/2013)

In March and early April, the House and Senate Subcommittees approved their budgets for fiscal year 2014.  The Subcommittees made some changes from the Governor’s budget proposal, including a rejection of Medicaid Expansion for adults with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, as well as making changes to online learning opportunities, the K-12 foundation allowance, best practices incentives, and juvenile justice facilities.  The House Appropriations Committee adopted all of the budget bills as approved by the Subcommittees with no amendments to the budget.  The Senate Appropriations Committee is expected to take up the budget bills the week of April 15, 2013.

House & Senate Appropriations Subcommittees Pass Fiscal Year 2014 Budgets: What It Means for Young Children and Their Families in Michigan (4/15/2013)

In March and early April, the House and Senate Subcommittees approved their budgets for fiscal year 2014.  The Subcommittees made some changes from the Governor’s budget proposal, including a rejection of Medicaid Expansion for adults with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, as well as some policy and funding changes to the Great Start Readiness Preschool Program.  The House Appropriations Committee adopted all of the budget bills as approved by the Subcommittees with no amendments to the budget.  The Senate Appropriations Committee is expected to take up the budget bills the week of April 15, 2013.

Medicaid Expansion in Michigan: Quick Facts on What It Means for Children, Youth and Families (04/2013)

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder made a huge step in a healthier direction for the state when he proposed to expand Medicaid access to Michigan residents by taking advantage of the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Though this expansion specifically covers adults in Michigan, it has huge implications for children and families in Michigan and the well-being of Michigan’s lowest-income families.  Learn more about Medicaid expansion, how it will help children and families, and what’s currently at stake in our latest Budget Basics fact sheet.

February 2013

The Governor’s Fiscal Year 2014 Budget: Is It Promoting Equity to Ensure All Children Are Ready to Learn & Lead? (2/25/2013)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce. As Michigan becomes more diverse, funding decisions that do not explicitly address underlying inequities in resource and opportunity will lead to longer-term fiscal hardships for all Michigan residents. Gaps in opportunity caused by Michigan’s profound economic hardships, coupled with structural barriers by race or ethnicity, contribute to gaps in achievement throughout a student’s educational career. These long-term disparities in educational and life success have had profound and unacceptable economic, social and fiscal consequences for Michigan.

Fiscal Year 2014 Budget: What the Governor is Proposing for Youth in Michigan (2/12/2013)

On Thursday, February 7, 2013, Governor Snyder released his proposed state budget for fiscal year 2014 (FY2014).  The Governor presented two budget bills to the Legislature, including an education bill that proposes funding for local and intermediate school districts, community colleges and higher education, and an omnibus bill that covers all state departments and services.  Changes in funding that will impact youth include an equity payment for districts to bring the minimum foundation allowance up to $7,000 per pupil, a reduction to the best practices grant, a new Digital Learning Innovation to expand blended and online learning to students, a new competitive Student-Centric learning grant, and new investment to the Pathways to Potential program.

Fiscal Year 2014 Budget: What the Governor is Proposing for Early Childhood in Michigan (2/8/2013)

Yesterday, Governor Snyder unveiled his budget proposal for fiscal year 2014 (FY2014) before a joint House and Senate Appropriations Committee.  As anticipated, Governor Snyder’s FY2014 budget, which begins October 1 of this year and ends September 30, 2014, includes significant investments for Michigan’s Great Start Readiness preschool program (GSRP).  Specifically, the Governor calls for a $130 million increase for GSRP over the next two years, starting with a $65 million increase for FY2014 that would not only increase access to the program for an additional 16,000 eligible but unenrolled four-year olds, but would also provide an increase in the slot amount from $3,400 to $3,625 per child.  Some changes are also made to the Office of Great Start, Healthy Kids Dental is expanded to include three more counties, and Medicaid and mental health coverage is expanded.

The Budget Process in Michigan: Opportunities to Advocate for Children & Families (2/2013)

The annual budget is the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities.  Michigan’s decision-makers need to prioritize budget investments that improve outcomes for all children by closing the equity gaps that begin early and accumulate over a lifetime.  Unfortunately, it has been difficult for many parents, teachers, community leaders and child advocates to become involved in the budget making process, particularly for those most likely to be impacted by decisions that may affect inequities. A major barrier is that the budget process is too unfamiliar to many, and budget bills often move quickly through legislative committees.  This overview tells you what you need to know about the state budget process so that you can get involved in budget advocacy.

January 2013

Federal Deficit Reduction Efforts Must Prioritize Michigan Children (1/2013)

The federal budget is the single most powerful expression of the federal government’s priorities. It is during the budget process that decisions are made about the expenditure of federal revenues, and there are many competing interests that the President and Congress must consider when dividing up tax dollars. With finite resources, changes in tax policies and in the appropriation of revenues can benefit groups of U.S. and Michigan residents, while leaving others behind. Of particular concern is the potential impact on the children and families that outcome data show are already facing challenges, including a lack of access to education and care in early childhood, health care throughout their lives, and opportunities for education and career success.

June 2012

On June 26, 2012, Governor Snyder signed the budget bills into law. The 2013 fiscal year begins October 1, 2012 and ends September 30, 2013. As anticipated, the final budgets were in the form of two omnibus bills – one for Education (PA 201) including School Aid, Community Colleges, and Higher Education; and another (PA 200) for all of the department budgets. The Governor vetoed several items in PA 200, including $1 million for before and after school programming and a $3 million increase for 0-3 prevention programs.  The Governor maintained the $5 million increase for the Great Start Readiness Program.

Three new Budget Basics publications look specifically at what happened in the fiscal year 2013 budget as it pertains to early childhood funding, funding for youth programming, and how the FY2013 budget will help to reduce or increase racial, ethnic and economic disparities in child outcomes.

The Fiscal Year 2013 State Budget:
What it Means for Early Childhood in Michigan
The Impact on Youth
Is it Promoting Equity to Ensure All Children Are Ready to Learn & Lead?

To read more about the final budgets, read our updated Budget Basics by state Department:
Department of Community Health Budget for FY13
Department of Human Services Budget for FY13
Education Budget for FY13

May 2012

The Fiscal Year 2013 State Budget: The Impact of Current Decisions on Youth – Which Decisions Have Been Made, and Which Remain In Play (5/3/2012)

The last week of April, the House and Senate approved all of their budget bills for fiscal year 2013. As anticipated, the House rolled up all of its budget bills into two omnibus bills – one for Education (HB 5372) including School Aid, Community Colleges, and Higher Education; and the department budgets into another omnibus budget bill (HB 5365). The Senate kept each budget bill separately. Differences between the final House and Senate budget bills will be negotiated in conference committees – our latest Budget Basics report highlights differences up for negotiation as they pertain to youth.

Fiscal Year 2013 Budgets Pass House and Senate (5/2/2012)

See updated Budget Basics publications on the Department of Community Health budget, the Department of Human Services budget, and the Education budgets as passed in the last week of April in both the House and Senate.  As anticipated, the House rolled up all of its budget bills into two omnibus bills – one for Education (HB 5372) including School Aid, Community Colleges, and Higher Education; and the department budgets into another omnibus budget bill (HB 5365). The Senate kept each budget bill separately.  Points of difference between the House and Senate budgets will now be debated in conference committee.

April 2012

Fiscal Year 2013 Investments in Early Childhood in Michigan: Points of Difference to be Negotiated in Conference Committee (4/27/2012)

The last week of April, the House and Senate approved all of their budget bills for fiscal year (FY) 2013. As anticipated, the House rolled up all of its budget bills into two omnibus bills – one for Education (HB 5372) including School Aid, Community Colleges, and Higher Education; and the department budgets into another omnibus budget bill (HB 5365). The Senate kept each budget bill separately and incorporated many amendments at the Committee level and full Senate level pertaining to early childhood. The final House and Senate budget bills are highlighted in our latest Budget Basics report including differences that will negotiated in conference committees.

Investments in Early Childhood in Michigan — Fiscal Year 2013 Highlights (4/13/2012)

This Budget Basics report provides background information on early childhood programming in Michigan, funding trends, and the fiscal year 2013 budget proposals as passed out of the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on key budget areas that affect young children in Michigan.

Appropriations Subcommittees Pass FY13 Education Budgets — April Update (4/4/2012)

This update of the Appropriations Subcommittees FY13 budgets includes Community Colleges and Higher Education.  The Senate and House Subcommittees FY13 Community College and Higher Education budget recommendations basically concur with the Governor’s funding levels for FY13. However, the Senate replaces $96.5 million in GF with School Aid funding for Community Colleges, resulting in all FY13 funding for Community Colleges coming from the School Aid Fund. The House Higher Education funding recommendation is $500,000 under the Governor’s total recommendation and $2.3 million under the state general fund recommendation through a program shift to the Treasury Department and increased reliance on federal TANF funds for financial aid programs.

Appropriations Subcommittees for the Department of Community Health Approve FY13 Budgets (4/4/2012)

On March 27, 2012, the House Appropriations Subcommittee for the Department of Community Health (DCH) approved its version of the fiscal year 2013 (FY2013) budget for the DCH. The budget includes $15.02 billion in total spending and restores community mental health services for special populations, rejects the Governor’s Wellness 4×4 Initiative and instead funds a before- and after-school physical health pilot program, and directs some federal dollars towards home visitation.  On March 29, 2012, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee finalized its fiscal year 2013 budget for the DCH and totals $15.04 billion in spending.  The Senate Subcommittee budget creates $100 placeholders for Medicaid, MIChild, and CSHCS to cover treatment for autism spectrum disorders; creates a $100 placeholder for the Healthy Kids Dental expansion; and creates a $100 placeholder for the Governor’s obesity and health promotion initiative.

Appropriations Subcommittees Pass Department of Human Services FY13 Budgets (4/4/2012)

On March 27, 2012, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee for the Department of Human Services (DHS) approved its version of the fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget for DHS (SB 956). The Senate Subcommittee’s $6.55 billion budget ($991 million state general fund) includes boilerplate language directing DHS to operate a pilot program in Kent County to privatize some child welfare services and includes the Governor’s recommended Supported Visitation program and Parent Partners program.  On March 28, 2012, the House Appropriations Committee approved its version of the FY13 budget (HB 5374). The House Committee’s budget totals $6.53 billion and reinstates $5 million for before- or after-school funding.

March 2012

Appropriations Subcommittees Pass School Aid and Department of Education Budgets for FY 2013 (3/29/12)

Earlier this week, the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees for School Aid and the Michigan Department of Education passed their budget bills for fiscal year 2013 (FY13).  The House Appropriations Subcommittee FY13 budget differs from the Governor’s budget in several key areas including funding for best practices grants and criteria, and the creation of a technology infrastructure grant.  The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee FY13 budget differs in areas such as the per pupil foundation allowance, implementation of an early childhood block grant, and pupil performance grants.  See details on the subcommittees’ FY13 budgets in our latest Budget Basics report.

February 2012

The Governor’s Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Budget: Is It Promoting Equity to Ensure All Children Are Ready to Learn and Lead? (2/24/12)

The single best predictor of economic prosperity is a state’s success in educating and preparing its workforce. Sadly, long-term disparities in educational success have had profound and unacceptable economic, social and fiscal consequences for Michigan. The state budget, as the single most powerful expression of the state’s priorities, is a powerful tool for either improving equity or widening gaps. Our latest Budget Basics report briefly explains how the Governor’s proposed fiscal year 2013 budget may impact equitable outcomes for children.

Governor Snyder Releases Fiscal Year 2013 Budget: A First Look at Provisions Affecting Children and Youths (2/10/12)

On Thursday February 9th, Governor Snyder presented his Fiscal Year 2013 budget proposal to the Legislature. Fiscal year 2013 begins October 1, 2012 and ends September 30, 2013.  Michigan’s Children has taken a quick look at how the proposal will impact children and youth in Michigan.

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