Monthly Archives February 2017

Staying the Course

February 10, 2017 – An old friend of mine died this week, her funeral was today. Louise Sause lived to be 104 years old, (wow, right), and I was blessed with several decades of both professional and personal relationships with her. For those of us who work in the Lansing area, and throughout the state honestly, on building better public policy for kids, we knew Louise. When I first met her, she had long since retired from a long career at Michigan State University as a professor, and was spending most of her time at that point working to get more people involved in the policy decision making process through the League of Women Voters. I was inspired by her expansive knowledge and her generosity in time and talent with those of us who worked hard to learn as much from her as we could.

While I could go on and on about Louise, what made me think to write about her was her commitment to this work over the long haul. As a person less than half her age, with so many fewer decades of work under my belt, I’ve been thinking about how important it is to stay the course. Despite challenging times to come at the federal, state and local policy levels, I know, so cliché, but true: this is a marathon, not a sprint, and we have to approach it as such.

As we begin a new legislative session, I tend to think about what didn’t get done in the last session. While this can be frustrating, particularly to people who are newer to advocacy and policy making, it is the wrong tact to take. One example is the Quality Assurance of Foster Care Act – a legislative package that had broad bi-partisan/bi-cameral support and still didn’t make it to the finish line before time ran out last year. While frustrating, that package of bills is in the process of being reintroduced by some of the original legislators and a few new ones. The package got a little better last session, after having been introduced the session before that. This session, it will be even better. We will be again proud to work on its passage.

One thing that we know is going to happen every single February: new state budget proposals, from the Governor and then the Legislature, to decide how we spend the money that we’ve gotten from taxpayers to benefit the children, youth and families who face the most challenges in our state. While an annual fight, and a quick one – the whole state budget process begins now and will likely be finished by early June – it is also a conversation for the long haul. The years that Michigan’s Children has been entering into that conversation and working to persuade policymakers that evidenced investments are the way to go, has mattered and will continue to matter. Even in the years where we feel like all we’ve accomplished was to stave off something more dire. I’m sure Louise had many of those years, as have I.

So, we move forward in 2017 with a purpose. For some, that represents decades of work. For others, just the beginning of their commitment. For all of us, who work to build better public policy in the best interest of children, youth and families in our state, it is our marathon to run. I only hope that I can run it as long as Louise did. Thank you for the inspiration!

– Michele Corey

A Big Thanks to You as I Move On

February 6, 2017 – This week marks my last week at Michigan’s Children.  As I reflect back on my time at this incredibly important organization, I am so proud of the work of this agency and our advocacy community.  I’m a firm believer in the essential nature of Michigan’s Children because of our holistic, cradle to career focus; and I’d like to highlight a few things that I’ve been privileged and honored to be a part of.

I’m proud that Michigan’s Children worked collaboratively with other early childhood advocates to see a $130 million increase in our state’s Great Start Readiness preschool program.  Sure, Michigan’s Children would’ve liked to have seen a focus on infants and toddlers in addition to the four-year-old investment, but I know our willingness to be committed as an advocacy coalition and to not muddy the proverbial advocacy waters led to the historic increase our state saw for preschool programming.

I’m proud that Michigan’s Children has continued to stand firmly by the needs of the lowest-income working families who depend on the state’s child care subsidy so that parents can work while their children learn.  And even more so, I’m proud of our dedication to the families who utilize unlicensed family, friend and neighbor care as they are an integral part of our child care system that we must continue to support.

I’m so proud that Michigan’s Children helped lead the way for Early On advocacy when there were no other independent voices in Lansing talking about this important system.  Without support from amazing Early On partners including administrators, providers, and families; Michigan’s Children wouldn’t have become a leading advocacy voice on this and it demonstrates the critical nature of our partnered work.  Because of our work, children in Flint who were impacted by the water crisis have seen additional resources in their community specifically for Early On.

Finally, I’m so proud of Michigan’s Children’s strategic focus.  We are a small but mighty team that provides an important independent voice for children, youth and families in Lansing and at the federal level.  With the new U.S. Presidential Administration, a lot of energy and attention has been focused inside the Beltway, and I’m admittedly a bit anxious about the work that lies ahead.  But I know Michigan’s Children’s commitment to equity is paramount and will continue to be a guiding force.  The team’s dedication to public policy and investment opportunities that best support the kids and families who face the most significant structural barriers to success is unwavering.

So you’re probably wondering where I’m going.  I accepted a position at the University of Michigan as a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Project Manager in the Division of Student Life.  After the last election season and the horrific rhetoric on the campaign trail – that is unfortunately continuing into this new Presidential Administration through policy action – diversity, equity and inclusion work feels essential for advocates to see more equitable public policies and investments.  This opportunity to foster the next generation of leaders in Michigan and the U.S. who understand the significance and value of our diverse society, the need and demand for equitable opportunities (including policies!), and the importance to ensure the inclusion of all people is essential for the success of our State and our Nation.

I know this is getting wordy but I have to end with a huge THANK YOU.  Thank you for being my partner and Michigan’s Children’s partner in advocacy work.  Our successes would have been failures without your support, your work, your communications with your policymakers.  Thank you for your unwavering commitment, and then some, for all you do for children and families in our state.  Your ongoing work continues to be essential and I will be continuing to fight the good fight with you from Ann Arbor.

Thanks again.  And Go Blue! (I can’t help myself!)  🙂

-Mina Hong

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